Moral Outrage
Whew! God help us!

All terrorist laws passed have been used against American citizens

The ‘worldwide indefinite detention without charge or trial’ provision of S.1867, the National Defense Authorization Act bill, the legislation will “basically say in law for the first time that the homeland is part of the battlefield,” said Sen. Lindsey Graham (R-S.C.), who supports the bill.

That provoked concerns that American citizens could be targeted as terrorists and indefinitely detained without trial or charge. “One section of these provisions, section 1031, would be interpreted as allowing the military to capture and indefinitely detain American citizens on U.S. soil,” Colorado Senator Mark Udall said in a speech earlier this month.

However, the controversy over whether or not the text of the bill suggests the legislation applies to U.S. citizens is largely inconsequential given the fact that every piece of anti-terror legislation passed since 9/11 has been used against Americans, both at home and abroad.

The Patriot Act was passed in the name of giving federal authorities the tools to catch terrorists, but it has been used in hundreds of cases against American citizens, often in cases that have no relation whatsoever to terrorism.

Furthermore, as Ron Paul has pointed out, Anwar al-Awlaki, an American citizen who has never been charged with any crime, was the victim of extrajudicial killing because of the same unconstitutional legalese that defines the entire globe as a “battlefield,” where the constitutional rights of U.S. citizens are declared null and void if they are designated as terrorists by the federal government.

Indeed, national intelligence director Dennis Blair openly stated last year that, “Being a U.S. citizen will not spare an American from getting assassinated by military or intelligence operatives.”

Recall that José Padilla, an American citizen, was held without charge for 3 and a half years as an “enemy combatant” and denied a trial in civilian court, after being accused of planning to detonate a “dirty bomb,” an accusation that was enough to keep Padilla in a military brig for over three years yet was never proven.

As far back as December 2002, the Washington Post reported that a “parallel legal system” had been put in place under the auspices of the war on terror, in which terrorism suspects — U.S. citizens and non-citizens alike — may be investigated, jailed, interrogated, tried and punished without legal protections guaranteed by the ordinary system.”

[Excerpt of Prison Planet article by Paul Joseph Watson]

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3 Responses to “All terrorist laws passed have been used against American citizens”

  1. December 1 – Ignoring a presidential veto threat, the Democratic-controlled Senate this afternoon moved along this legislation (and massive defense bill) that would deny suspected terrorists, even U.S. citizens seized within the nation’s borders, the right to trial and subject them to indefinite detention.

    One amendment that would have specifically blocked the measures from being used against U.S. citizens was voted down and the final bill was passed 93-7.The Senate also rejected an effort by Intelligence Committee Chairman Dianne Feinstein to limit a military custody requirement for suspects to those captured outside the United States. The vote was 55-45.

    Feinstein, D-Calif., said her goal was to ensure “the military won’t be roaming our streets looking for suspected terrorists.” Feinstein said the last time the government held U.S. citizens indefinitely was when Japanese-Americans were interned in camps during World War II.

    Mark Kirk of Illinois has called the provision unconstitutional, violating the Fourth Amendment and the right of individuals to be secure in their homes from unreasonable searches and seizures.

    The bill’s language challenges citizens’ rights under the Constitution, tests the boundaries of executive and legislative branch authority and sets up a showdown with President Obama.

  2. […] Obama’s signing statement tries to reassure observers that he wouldn’t use the “law” to detain citizens. […]

  3. […] month, terrorism suspects are to be held by the military; the president also has the authority to indefinitely detain citizens accused of terrorism. The government continues to claim the right to strip citizens of legal […]


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